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Fall River waterfront district plans improvements to parks, pier

Fall River waterfront district plans improvements to parks, pier

Fall River waterfront district plans improvements to parks, pier

FALL RIVER — The city’s waterfront is undergoing drastic changes, with the Route 79 corridor project underway and the MBTA commuter rail station opening in a few months. But advocates for the waterfront also have more down-to-earth neighborhood concerns on their minds that affect residents’ quality of life, including summer parties at the city pier and improving parks. 

The Fall River Waterfront Cultural District’s management team held a meeting at Heritage State Park’s visitors center on Wednesday to air its concerns before a panel of public officials. 

“We are willing to do everything we need to do to keep this district growing, and we ask that you do the same with us,” said Creative Arts Network co-founder Sandy Dennis, one of the district’s managers. 

Here are five things you need to know about the meeting: 

How do you get there from here?Your Route 79 shutdown and construction questions answered

The Fall River Waterfront Cultural District includes everything between Davol Street and the Taunton River from Bicentennial Park to Borden Light Marina, and Columbia Street.

What is Fall River’s Waterfront Cultural District?  

A state-designated “cultural district” is an area of the city that basically serves as a cultural and economic hub — a place with local character where tourists are welcome and there’s room for growth.   

Fall River’s district was formed in 2020. The zone is a long strip containing everything between the Taunton River and Davol Street from just north of Bicentennial Park down to Almond Street past the Borden Light Marina. A leg of the district also extends up Columbia Street to South Main. 

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  • June 25, 2023